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5 Tips on Portraiture with the Fujifilm X Series

We hear more and more stories of photographers making the Fujifilm X Series their go-to kit for portraiture. The series is ideal for this style. The lightweight equipment allows portrait photographers to nimbly adjust around their subjects and the vivid colour processing makes subjects look stunning.

 

Get the most out of portraits with an X Series kit by following these tips.

 

  1. Fill your frame with complementary colours.

You chose your X Series likely in part for its vibrant colour processing. So make colours pop perfectly in your portraits as you play with contrast and hue. To the extent, you control attire and scene for your shoot, find colours that complement each other and especially those in your subject’s eyes and skin. If necessary, look at a colour wheel to strategize your fashion and setting.

Image by Edo Xu

 

  1. Bring a street photo mindset to portraiture.

Not all portrait photography requires studio space or time slots for your subjects. Get to the streets and capture portraits from the urban bustle. For this style of portraiture, use the XF23mmF1.4 R, which has a 63-degree angle of view, or a similar wide-angle lens to capture both your subject and your scene in detail.

Image by Derek Snee

  1. Get candid portraits with a quick X Series lens.

On streets, at events or in studio, permit your subjects to move freely, and then follow them for candid portraits. Make sure to get them in the act of something viewers can understand, and look for moments when their hand position adds emotion. For these fleeting moments, you want a lens with a quick autofocus sensor. Go with the XF23mmF1.4 R mentioned above or the XF35mmF2 R WR.

Image by Brandon Wong

 

  1. Clarify your subject by using bokeh.

One way to make your subject a focal point in a portrait is to use bokeh, the blurring of out-of-focus regions. To get this effect, portrait photographers favour lenses with wide maximum apertures. While the XF23mmF1.4 R and the XF35mmF2 R WR both fit this category, the XF56mmF1.2 R is the optimum Fujinon lens to achieve sharp bokeh.

Image by Ashri Husaeni

 

  1. Frame portraits by using foreground objects.

You can add a creative layer to your composition by placing your subject behind a framing foreground image. Tree branches, plant leaves, window frames and another person’s shoulder are just some of your options for framing. This style of composition works well with the bokeh effect, as you can accentuate the spatial gap between your subject and the framing device.

Image by Dan Ginn

 

With the right equipment, techniques and mindset, you are ready to snap captivating portraits with your Fujifilm X Series kit.

 

3 replies »

  1. Just so ya know. Bokeh is not the blurring of out-of-focus regions. Bokeh refers to the quality of the out of focus “regions.”

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