IN FOCUS: Film Simulation modes used by the professionals

IN FOCUS is a series of articles where we ask some of the UK X-Photographers to give us advice, provide insight into their photography and share some of their favourite images of all time. In this blog, we asked our photographers what Film Simulation modes they use and why.


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Sports Photography as a Spectator – Horse Racing

By Jeff Carter

In a series of articles X Photographer Jeff Carter will be shooting at sports events in the UK and showing how to capture great images with the Fujifilm X Series without the need for a media pass. Continue reading Sports Photography as a Spectator – Horse Racing

9 Ways to Gain Better Rainy Day Photos

That torrential downpour you see out the window some days could signal the end of your next big shoot — or it could indicate a new, albeit slushier, opportunity. Rain brings new possibilities for portrait, landscape and other genres of photos.

 

Take up some savvy ways to set up these rain shots so you and your subjects minimize time spent in puddles as you get the perfect pic.

 

Fear not — it’s just water.

If you want the best rain photography, you have to be willing to get wet. Dress for the weather, whenever possible, and embrace a bit of discomfort for the sake of perfecting your craft.

Photo by Nick Edmunson

 

Use microfiber cloths to keep your gear dry.

Just as you should dress for the weather, so too should your equipment. Even weather resistant gear is better off not getting drenched, and you are going to want your lens dry for most shots.

 

Create contrast by shooting in low light.

Raindrops are most apparent in twilight and nighttime shots, especially if the picture is eventually published in black and white. Viewers’ eyes are called to textures and patterns, like rippling puddles or splashing raindrops, with less light — and thus less colour.

Photo by Bob Cooley

 

Backlight your raindrops for visibility.

While low light calls attention to patterns, backlight makes subjects in its path more visible. Try shooting toward – though not directly into – a light source to see the raindrops against its luminosity. Streetlights are great for this approach.

 

Establish complementary light with your flash.

Yet another way to illuminate raindrops is to use your flash. It does not have to be your primary light source. Instead, it can be lowered by a few stops to supply complementary light that lets the precipitation glisten.

 

Research in advance for portraiture scenes.

Rain can be an interruption to portraiture sessions, but maybe your clients embrace its melancholy vibe. Survey your area for potential compositions where your subject could pose at length without getting soaked.

Photo by Jason Vinson

 

Place your subject beneath an awning or overhang.

Keep your subject dry for a portrait session by setting the shot beneath a covering on the street. This provides shelter, and the composition has a natural feel, seeing as people often wait out storms beneath these coverings.

 

Move out of the shower and behind the wheel.

Like awnings and overhangs, cars serve as adequate shelter and realistic scenes. Vehicles are good for more than composition, though. If the rain is too much for you and your equipment, and if you don’t have a sufficient umbrella, shoot from your car.

 

Capture the humanity in rainy day reactions.

It is difficult to be unaffected by rain. Reactions range from puddle dances to dread-faced power walks. Street photography on rainy days can highlight characteristics of joy, resilience and vulnerability in fresh ways.

Photo by Erwin T Lim

 

Rain does not have to be end of your shoot. It can be the beginning, so long as your eyes stay open to creative opportunities. To learn more about the cameras you could be using for your rain photography sessions, check out our eBook, Which X Series Should I Buy?

 

IN FOCUS: 11 inspiring photography locations around the world

IN FOCUS is a series of articles where we ask some of the UK X-Photographers to give us advice, provide insight into their photography and share some of their favourite images of all time. In this blog, we wanted to go in search of the most inspiring locations for photography.


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IN FOCUS: 12 unusual images and how they were taken

IN FOCUS is a series of articles where we ask some of the UK X-Photographers to give us advice, provide insight into their photography and share some of their favourite images of all time. In this blog post, they share some of their most unusual images and explain how they were shot.


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IN FOCUS: 13 things you should do to improve your photography

IN FOCUS is a new series of articles where we will be asking some of the UK X-Photographers to give us advice, provide insight into their photography and share some of their favourite images of all time. In this blog post, they tell us what we should be doing to help improve our photography.


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Travel Light – The Ancient and Modern in Mexico

By Jeff Carter

Travel Light – The Ancient and Modern in Mexico

There is nothing like visiting a faraway land for the first time. Most photographers relish the opportunity to discover new places and experience a different culture. Continue reading Travel Light – The Ancient and Modern in Mexico

The Advantage of Mirrorless

Since mirrorless digital cameras entered the photography scene in the late 2000s, the question has been whether they could be a better option than DSLRs (Digital Single Lens Reflex). Since that time, the mirrorless system has grown in popularity, so it is clear photographers are increasingly making it their preference.

 

What’s a DSLR?

DSLR cameras (or digital single-lens reflex) use the design of old-school 35mm bodies, with light taking a path from the lens to the prism and then to the viewfinder, where you can see the preview of your image. As you hit the shutter button, the mirror flips up, a shutter opens and light reaches the image sensor, which retains the picture.

 

What’s a mirrorless camera?

The big difference with the mirrorless camera is that it has no mirror that flips when you open the shutter. Instead, light moves directly from the lens to the image sensor and the shot displays on your screen.

 

 

Which style is lighter?

Because mirrorless cameras do not need to store a mirror and a prism, they do not need to be as heavy or as large. If you like to travel with your camera or just enjoy a lightweight rig, then you may prefer the mirrorless system.

 

Which body has better focus?

Many years ago, DSLRs had the reputation of being the better – or at least faster – model for autofocus shooting. This is because DSLRs used phase detection, a quicker method that relies more on the camera’s electronic sensor, rather than contrast detection, the slower but more accurate system utilised in most mirrorless bodies. However, mirrorless cameras have since improved in this area. Now, many mirrorless bodies, including Fujifilm’s newer models, employ a contrast-phase hybrid autofocus system.

 

Which style is suited for continuous shooting?

If you want to capture fast-moving action, you may want a camera with the capacity for continuous shooting. Mirrorless cameras, with their simplified path for obtaining images, excel here. For instance, the Fujifilm X-T2, when photographing from its continuous shooting boost mode, shoots about 11 frames per second, well ahead of most other cameras on the market.

FUJIFILM X-T2

 

Which one shows an accurate shot in its viewfinder?

Mirrorless cameras also have viewfinders that display truer to what your photograph will become. Their electronic viewfinders allow you to see, in real time, adjustments to aperture and ISO, whereas the optical viewfinder found in DSLRs displays those changes only after you shoot the image. The mirrorless style has a big advantage here, as it saves you time from going back and forth between shooting and adjusting.

 

As with many debates over photography equipment, the choice comes down to your personal preference. If you find a camera that you handle comfortably and shoot naturally, then proudly make it yours and enjoy creating great shots with it!

 

For more Fujifilm camera options, download our 2017 Buying Guide.

Making your photos WILD! – A Guide to Wildlife Photography

By Ben Cherry

With ‘wild’ experiences becoming rarer as humanity continues its ferocious endeavour to progress, often at the natural world’s expense, how can we treasure those encounters however big or small? I personally think photography is the single most powerful medium when it comes to nature. Continue reading Making your photos WILD! – A Guide to Wildlife Photography