Why lens choice is important?

Use of different focal lengths

This blog is going to try and cover the fundamentals of lenses, explaining when to use them and why. If you have any questions after reading this then please get in touch via:

If you haven’t already seen Dale Young’s great blog on “What focal length I should use and why?” Then check it out here.

I too took some photos at different focal lengths (see the below slideshow), between 10mm and 135mm, to emphasise how certain focal lengths are generally better than others for portraiture. This topic has brought up lots of comments and I have edited this part a number of times to try and get the best brief explanation, without going off on too big a tangent! To break it down to fundamentals, the thing that affects perspective is distance, the distance between the camera and the subject. The focal length you choose affects the framing of a subject. With the series of photos below, I tried to keep the framing the same for all the focal lengths; the thing that changed was the distance between the subject and me. At 10mm I was a mere few cm’s from the subject’s face (awkward), while at 135mm we were a few metres apart. This longest example (135mm) shows a flattening effect, where the content seems compressed. This occurs because of greater distance between the subject and myself. Making the depth of the face (e.g. from the nose to the ear) proportionally less compared to the distance between the subject and the lens… The opposite is true for the wide-angle photos. Take the 10mm example again; I am so close to the subject that the depth of the face makes up a larger distance than the distance between the lens and the nose, making the perspective exaggerated (also note how you can see the shadow behind the model with the wide-angle shots but you can’t with the telephoto portraits because of the narrower angle of view).

In full frame or 35mm film terminology, 50mm is deemed the ‘standard focal length’, as it is close to our eye’s central angle of view. This means that a 50mm lens produces a perspective very similar to what we see. Because the sensors in Fujifilm X-Series cameras are generally 1.5X smaller than full frame sensors (APS-C sensor size), this standard focal length equates to a 35mm lens, like the XF35mm F1.4 R. This is quite complicated to explain (it could be a whole other blog!)… So much so that I have spent hours editing these paragraphs, but hopefully you get the gist of how different focal lengths affect the perspective of a picture. There are some very informative comments about this topic at the bottom of this blog if you want to find out more.

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Wide-angle lenses can create exaggerate perspectives which produce amusing (which is good as it’s engaging) portraits, especially with animals!


Apertures

Before we go any further, lets just check you understand the fundamentals of using apertures. If not then check out my previous blog that helps to explain how different apertures affect a picture (plus there are cute labrador puppies!).


Putting both together

35mm f1.4
35mm f1.4

Now that we understand how different focal lengths and apertures affect the look of a picture we can look at how to combine the two. First of all lets think about portraits: If you want to isolate a subject generally you are going to want to use a standard or telephoto lens with a low F-stop, such as the XF35mm F1.4 RXF56mm F1.2 R or the imminent XF50-140mm F2.8 R OIS WR. For the image to the left I wanted to try and isolate the woman from the background as it was very busy and distracting, and while it isn’t entirely clean it is made better as a result of using F1.4 for a shallow depth of field.

If you want to capture an environmental portrait generally you would use a wide-angle lens and depending on how much of the environment you want to make out in the background you’d range the F-stop between F2 and F11.

Both of the pictures above were taken with the X100s (I love using it for these kinds of photos). The left image is at F2 and while you can make out the room the clarity of it is poor. Compare that to the right image where the use of F11 results in the mountain behind the boarder being sharp.


Prime vs. Zoom

This is very much a personal preference, there is no right choice. It depends on lots of factors, from space and weight restrictions to financial limitations. Because prime lenses have a fixed focal length, they tend to be smaller, lighter and have larger minimum apertures (F1.2-2.8) compared to zoom lenses. While zoom lenses have the convenience of effectively including many different prime lenses, generally these have more restricted apertures (F2.8-5.6). For me, it depends on the situation. I prefer prime lenses because of the greater depth of field control. As well as this I believe that the fixed focal length makes you think more about your photography, particularly composition. However, the convenience of zoom lenses in situations that are changing quickly can be invaluable as you don’t have to change lenses as often to obtain a variety of photographs. When conditions are unpleasant this is vital in order to protect the sensor. A point to consider is that the XF18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR plus the recently released XF50-140mm F2.8 and XF16-55mm F2.8 R WR (hopefully arriving in the first quarter of 2015) are all weather sealed making them ideal partners for the X-T1, creating a weather sealed system.

If I am working in relatively controlled conditions where it is easy for me to change lens regularly then I try to use prime lenses.

But if conditions are not suitable for continuous lens changes or a situation is quickly evolving and I need to be on my toes the zoom lenses are what I grab.

The zoom lens examples above are all wildlife examples (which are often taken in difficult conditions where a situation is quickly changing) were captured with the telephoto half of the XF18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR. The reason why I chose these examples is because I wanted to show what can be done with F5.6 as the maximum aperture, showing nice bokeh in the images where I’ve tried to keep the attention on the subject. Now imagine what will be possible with the new XF50-140mm F2.8 R OIS WR! Can you tell I’m a bit excited about it…?


What lens for the occasion?

The main reason I first moved to the Fujifilm X-Series was the prioritisation of high quality lenses. With the announcement of the X-Pro1, the first lenses available were the XF18mm F2 R, XF35mm F1.4 R and XF60mm F2.4 R. These are all high quality, lightweight prime lenses that, together, offer a wide focal length range package. From there the lens road map laid out Fujifilm’s intentions to create a strong lens collection covering a wide range of uses.

Generally lenses are associated with a particular genre of photography based on their focal length. For example wide lenses such as the XF14mm F2.8 R and XF10-24mm F4 R OIS are intended for landscapes and long lenses like the XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS are for wildlife and sports. But rules are made to be broken and your lenses don’t necessarily have to be used to fit those stereotypes. The photograph below was taken with the 14mm lens, generally intended for landscape photography, however I used this lens to capture this macaque foraging for stranded marine life amidst a sunset scene.

14mm - Foraging macaque
14mm – Foraging macaque

The important thing to remember with your lens choice is to think “what do I want to convey?” On this occasion I wanted to show the scene as a whole. In the landscape shot below I focused on the distant hills over a bay with the setting sun using the 55-200mm lens, which is usually associated with wildlife and sports. This helped to emphasise the golden glow which wasn’t as prevalent with a wider-angle view.

120mm - Landscape
120mm – Landscape

Conclusion

Hopefully you now understand that lens choice can have a huge impact on your end result. If you understand the principles of focal lengths and apertures then you have a grasp on what lens to use and why. Remember that lenses are tools designed to help fuel your creativity. For me, a lens that I am very much looking forward to is the XF50-140mm F2.8 R OIS WR. This lens offers the versatility of a zoom but with a constant aperture of F2.8 it gives very good depth of field control. A lens such as this has many uses and I’m sure it is going to be a big hit with photographers from all genres.

A good exercise to try would be to force yourself to use one focal length next time you go for a walk. No matter if you’re using a prime or a zoom lens, try and restrict yourself. The purpose of this is to understand what you can capture with certain focal lengths so that in the future you will hopefully be more decisive with what focal length to use in a given situation. Remember that you can change the end picture dramatically through different apertures. Why not give it a go and then share with us the variety of photographs you managed to capture with the same focal length. Or you can change it up and use one aperture but change your focal lengths. Share your results with us and if you have any questions please get in touch via the contact details at the top.

Until next time, happy Shooting!

Ben Cherry

Taking the X-T1 into the deep blue

Just to make it clear, I am not an underwater photographer. I have dabbled in it from time to time in locations of incredible marine life, such as snorkelling around coral reefs. The North Sea has a high abundance of marine life and the coast of Penzance is one of two places that you can consistently see blue sharks (the other is Cape Town). So when Danny Copeland, a fellow University of Sheffield Zoology graduate, spoke about his plan to go and see them with Charles Hood, a local charter skipper (http://charleshood.com), I jumped at the chance to join him.

Previously I have used DSLRs for underwater photography in a Ewa-Marine underwater housing. This time though I wanted to continue to push the X-T1 in difficult conditions so I put it in the same housing with the 10-24mm. Despite being dwarfed by the bag, the set up worked really well.

Thanks to Danny Copeland for this photo of me and the camera. Follow Danny on twitter to get the latest on underwater photography and marine conservation.

Ben Cherry XT1 underwater

Once we reached 10 miles out to sea we started chumming using mackerel heads (yum) to attract the sharks. Once they were in the area the four of us that went on the trip were able to slip into the water. Once I had checked the housing was sealed I swam around to find some subjects and came across this large jellyfish surrounded by lots of little fish. This example highlights the benefit of using a zoom lens underwater as I was able to get two very different perspectives using different focal lengths.

24mm

Blue Shark trip-6

10mmBlue Shark trip

Conditions were generally slightly overcast which actually meant there was a lovely soft light, which helped control the highlights that would have been a problem if it was a clear, sunny day. However this did mean that it was slightly dark in the water, even at the surface, so I shot at ISO 1600 to start and pushed this as the sediment levels rose throughout the day. Other settings I made sure I had set up on the boat were: continuous focus with focus priority, continuous high speed shooting (8fps), matrix metering and LCD only display. Generally I was using aperture f5.6 to strike a balance between a fast shutter speed and a good depth of field.

Because I was wearing a mask and the camera was in a housing I couldn’t utilise the wonderful EVF but instead found the LCD screen to be a great alternative. It allowed me to have a clear view of the shark(s) by not having my face to the camera and provided easy viewing of composition through the back of the camera. The advantage of the X-T1 is that I have not noticed any difference in focusing speeds between the EVF and LCD, which isn’t always the case. All of these factors meant that I could really take in this remarkable experience as one shark in particular became more and more inquisitive…

Rising out of the depth

Blue Shark trip-4

Coming in for a closer look

Blue Shark trip-8

Closer…

Blue Shark

Moments before bumping the lens!

Blue Shark trip-5

The camera only helped to make the experience more memorable, with the shark showing interest in it. With an animal like this it was so interesting to witness its intelligence and curiosity, the term ‘spaniels of the sea’ I feel is very apt. At one stage the shark photo-bombed a picture of Danny!

Shark photo-bomb

Blue Shark trip-7

Despite coming very close, it whole situation was very calm and meant that the interaction was an absolute joy. The shark even seemed to show a happy expression.

Playful shark

Blue Shark trip-2

Overall, the X-T1 and 10-24mm set up exceeded my expectations. I knew it would follow subjects well but I thought that shooting through water would probably lower the hit rate. However, the only factor that affected this was human error. With a specifically designed underwater housing, this camera and lens set up would be a brilliant choice for any underwater photographer, with its small size, clear controls and superb image quality.

Ben Cherry – Who am I?

Hi there, my name is Ben Cherry and I am a guest blogger for Fujifilm. My primary interests are wildlife and travel photography but I’ve previously covered events from motorsport and snowboarding films to fashion shoots and weddings.

I have been a Fujifilm X-Series user for a year now, ever since I used an X-Pro1 for a trip Malaysian Borneo.

Ben Cherry X-Pro1
This is me…

What I look for in a photograph is a moment, from a smile to unusual animal behaviour, I try to capture a photograph that encompasses a situation and can tell a story. To me, photography is a form of story telling, like writing and painting it is how the content is perceived by the viewer that is important. If someone experiences an image, feeling and/or viewing the subject the way the photographer did at the moment of clicking the shutter, then to me that is the ultimate prize in expressing your experience of a moment.

Why Fujifilm?

I use Fujifilm cameras because for me this is the best system for my work, offering superb image quality, a small compact size for travelling and a wonderful enjoyment factor through the manual controls. From the X100s to the X-T1, all of the products I use offer something different to my photography, whether it’s the low light capabilities of the 23mm f1.4, 35mm f1.4 and 56mm f1.2 or the pocket-ability, go nowhere without it, design of the X100s.

The clear purpose and design of each product gives me the clarity needed to choose the right gear for the job at hand. In future posts I will be discussing what the Fujifilm X-Series offers me and also explain some helpful hints and tips for those who are new to photography and to those who are new to the X-Series.

In the meantime you can check out some of my previous blogs here and check out my website and social media:

www.bencherryphotos.com
Facebook page
Twitter
Instagram

Fujifilm XF18-135mm Weather Resistant lens first impressions

So I got my hands on the new XF18-135mm lens a few weeks ago and I had planned to prepare a blog post about my thoughts and also contain some images showing off just how versatile a lens this was.

However, my colleagues in Japan politely asked me to hold it off because the sample lens I was using was a very early pre-production version and the image quality it would produce wouldn’t do justice to the full production version.

Personally, I think this was just a typically Japanese polite way of saying “don’t publish those images, they are terrible” 🙂

So instead of posting my thoughts (which I will do in time once I have a REAL lens to use) I am simply posting the thoughts of a couple of photographers who have also been using pre-production lenses, but were not politely asked to not publish any image 😉

Please bear in mind that all images on both of these 3rd party blogs were NOT shot on final versions, but I am sure you will find David, Ben and Kerry’s comments interesting:

David Cleland

Image taken by David Cleland
Image taken by David Cleland

When Fujifilm make announcements about new cameras or lens I always react with acute excitement. Ever since the release of the weather sealed Fujifilm X-T1 I have been longing for the release of their first weather sealed lens. When Fujifilm announced the XF 18-135mm lens with image stabilisation I couldn’t wait to have a completely weather sealed system for out in the Northern Ireland mountains.

Read more »

 

Ben Cherry

Image taken by Ben CherryImage taken by Ben Cherry

I was lucky enough to be contacted by Fujifilm UK to use one of the prototypes of the XF18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R OIS WR lens to obtain some wildlife shots. Being a part of the Fujifilm X-Photographers is a real honour, and to be asked to try out a prototype lens is an opportunity I am extremely grateful for. Within two hours of the first email being sent I had thought up some ideas on how I could get some wildlife shots.

Read more »

 

Kerry Hendry

Images by Kerry Hendry

I am not going to write a super in-depth technical assessment of the lens – there will be many who will do that once the fully finished product is released. But, I have been using the lens on almost every shoot over the last 6 weeks or so. I’ve shot racing, polo and also some landscapes – so have given the lens a real ‘hands on’ test. And I love what I’ve seen.

Read more »

“Why the X series?” with Martin Castein

Why choose the X-Series? Read our guest blog by Martin Castein to find out.

About Martin
Martin has achieved 18 gold awards at SWPP (Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers) which is one of the largest international photography organizations in the world. Is the 2013 SWPP architectural photographer of the year and has also been nominated by the judges as the SWPP overall photographer of the year for 2013.

The Fuji X-series journey for me began with the excellent X-E1 and now the X-Pro1. The weight-saving advantage of the X series is obvious. But let’s look a little deeper than that.

EVF and Sensor
For the type of photography I do, I like to bring out a lot of detail, colour and contrast in my images.
So for me it is vital that I get my exposures absolutely perfect and that the sensor of the camera is truly capable when it comes to delivering detail, dynamic range and the tone the sensor produces, particularly skin tones.
Let me give you an example. This image was processed in Lightroom. The sensor can handle the complex lighting easily, in fact better than some current top end DSLRs I have owned.

XF-18-55mm - ISO200 - f/2.8
XF-18-55mm – ISO200 – f/2.8

Colour
I work mostly in colour. I love colour.
We live in the digital age where colour can be so expressive and powerful.
The Fuji X-series sensor can match and in most instances beat other manufacturers when it comes to these issues.

When the X-trans sensor is combined with the live exposure of the Fuji X-series EVF, we have the recipe for a very high hit-rate of usable images.
This next image was taken with a wall blocking half the image, the flare on the left is from a window, not post production. I could see this in viewfinder before I took the image, this aids creativity. Post production in Lightroom again, very simple with the brilliant colour of the X-trans sensor.

XF18-55mm - ISO640 - f/4
XF18-55mm – ISO640 – f/4

Manual focus
I really love the ability to use manual focus and then have the back button do autofocus should I require it. I use this all the time. It is like manual focus with auto focus override. With other systems we have auto focus with manual override.
This works because it is so easy to see what is in focus in the EVF.
I can see the focus peeking, working all the time. This way I can fire off shots freely, capturing moments and know immediately when it is time to change my focus. That’s the benefit of not needing to take the camera away from your eye. What you see is what you get.

LCD screen
Additionally, it is an advantage to have a rear LCD screen that can focus the same way as the viewfinder can. This allows me to get unusual angles and shoot from angles that wouldn’t be easy to manage with a DSLR. In the past I went through a lot of trial and error with a DSLR to get the same angles.

Advantages
So for me the biggest advantage of the X-series is the combination of the incredible performance of the X-trans sensor with Fuji’s brilliant implementation of the electronic viewfinder and manual focusing. Of course coupled with the savings in size and weight.

Lets remember
We are artists. As photographers we rely on our equipment to allow us to fulfil our artistic vision. The urge that drives us to create, that is what we are all about as photographers. The tool we do that with, our camera, ultimately either enhances this ambition or it stifles it.
The fact is our choice of camera affects how we feel about photography.
Fuji made that t-shirt we all like to wear, they made the camera that speaks to the photographer in a way that is hard to verbalise other than it feels right.

XF35mm - ISO200 - f/5.6
XF35mm – ISO200 – f/5.6

To see more of Martin’s work, please visit his website here or follow him on Facebook

 

X-T1 – Shoot anywhere – The DIY store with Dale

Not sure what to shoot? Neither was I yesterday, so I took to the ‘streets’ of Bedford with an X-T1 and a XF56mm lens. 

I decided my aim was to try and get some ‘shoot from the hip’ style shots. A little blend of people and interesting objects with a snap of the shutter, so where better to start than a DIY store?

We set off on our ‘adventure’ just as the rain started to fall, this was perfect for a little weather testing. I caught these images of a gentleman leaving the DIY store preparing for his departure into the ‘monsoon’. I tried to keep the shutter fast to capture his movements, on reflection I might have stopped the aperture down a touch to get a little more in focus.

X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/800 - f/2 - ISO200
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/800 – f/2 – ISO200
X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/600 - f/2 - ISO200
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/600 – f/2 – ISO200

Once inside, I was instantly drawn to the lighting department, after all, photography is all about light and so where better place to start. The XF56mm lens really gave me that perfect focal length to get in close enough to capture the mood of the lights and keep out the exterior of the store itself. I also really wanted to try out the bokeh of this cracking lens, so I shot the second one at F/1.2.

X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/420 - f/2 - ISO200
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/420 – f/2 – ISO200
X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/800 - f/1.2 - ISO200
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/800 – f/1.2 – ISO200

After we left the lighting department we had a good wander around as Marc actually needed something from the store after all! I managed to grab a few shots as we went and found the autofocus to be working very well shooting from the hip. I didn’t quite get the compositions I wanted shooting this way but, it was nothing a little cropping couldn’t solve.

X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/100 - f/2 - ISO400
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/100 – f/2 – ISO400
X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/100 - f/2 - ISO320
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/100 – f/2 – ISO320

I love looking about, trying to ‘see’ a potential photograph from an otherwise bland object, and being in a DIY store there were certainly lots of random bits and pieces to shoot. I’ve found that the XF56mm lens is a superb focal length in general but also for these close up ‘artistic angular’ shots. Here is an example of a BBQ I saw while we were there. It was the way the light fell around the chrome effect metal that drew me to take the shot.

X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/100 - f/2.8 - ISO200
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/100 – f/2.8 – ISO200

After finishing our tour of the store we actually re-visited the lighting department for one last photo…

Which you can see Marc was thrilled to be part of!

X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/100 - f/2.8 - ISO320
X-T1 – XF56mm lens – 1/100 – f/2.8 – ISO320

 

I personally think it is always a good idea to experiment with your camera angles, sometimes it’s all that’s needed to turn a shot from bland to grand! This doesn’t mean you have to stand on your head mind you! Just ‘play’, enjoy the fact you can shoot as many pictures as you like and simply delete the ones that were not good enough. No one ever has to know!

Here was the last shot I managed to grab whilst Marc was driving us back to the office, not perfectly in focus but I did shoot through the car window and edited out Marc’s head from the equation! I also desaturated the colour a little as I wanted to capture that dull, moody weather we were so very much enjoying.

X-T1 - XF56mm lens 1/500 - f/8 - ISO200
X-T1 – XF56mm lens
1/500 – f/8 – ISO200

All in all, I would say it was nearly a success, after all, I did take some pictures and Marc found what he was looking for in the store. I think the aspect I could’ve improved on was being more confident shooting the subjects on-the-fly from an eye level perspective, rather than shooting from the hip. You may have found yourself in the same situation if you have ever tried ‘street’ photography, certainly it is a blast though and definitely worth trying out if you haven’t already. Maybe in a future blog I’ll try again and see if I can improve on my skills, until then, happy snapping!

Written by Dale Young

Guest post: Hands on with the XF10-24mmF4 R OIS

Title image: 24.0 mm (in 35mm: 36.0 mm) 1/8 sec; f/4.5; ISO 6400

By Gianluca Colla

I generally do not like to write reviews of products without a long and intensive field test. And by long I do not mean days – I mean several months.

I also don’t like writing first impressions of a camera or lens, because in a few days, even shooting many hours, I do not have enough time to get perfectly tuned with the gear I am using. I still remain a stranger and there is still the excitement of the new toy.

It’s almost like in real life, with couples. You can (almost) never tell after a first date or two if your partner will be “the one” but after several months of dating, you get a quite good idea if your relationship will go for a long run.

That’s why, although I’ve been one of the first and privileged people in the world to get my hands on the X-T1, long before it was announced, I didn’t write anything about it yet.

This was all true until one night in Yokohama, Japan, where a group of X-Photographers are gathered to speak at CP+, I went out with some friends and colleagues, and coupled the latest X-series with the Fujinon XF10-24mm F4 R OIS.

13.8 mm   (in 35mm: 21.0 mm) 1/8 sec;   f/4.5;   ISO 6400
13.8 mm (in 35mm: 21.0 mm)
1/8 sec; f/4.5; ISO 6400

Love at first sight
I guess this is what is known as love at first sight. A perfect match. When you know there is no need to further test, or to “date” a little bit longer because you simply know it will be a long-lasting and happy relationship.

There are plenty of detailed reviews online and plenty of technical data sheet about the camera and the lens, there is no need to cover again that kind of information.

11.5 mm   (in 35mm: 17.0 mm) 1/32 sec;   f/4.0;   ISO 3200
11.5 mm (in 35mm: 17.0 mm)
1/32 sec; f/4.0; ISO 3200

All I can say is that the camera is designed to fit perfectly in the hands and to have that kind of tactile feel that only a vintage camera could offer and is designed with a lot of technology inside but with a simple usage in mind. And the lens, is just amazing: wide open is razor sharp, it has an impressive OIS that can easily hold 5 stops, all you have to do is get out and shoot. And this is what the X-T1is made for: to simply take beautiful picture, to forget about the technical race and to focus on what should be every photographer’s main concern: making stunning images.

I want to add is this:

  • 3200 or 6400 ISO
  • 1/8th and 1/4th of a second, handheld (yes, you read it correctly, handheld – God bless OIS and the small weight of the camera)
  • f4

You judge the result your self. All of the images featured here were taken on the X-T1 with a (pre-production) XF10-24mmF4 lens and are JPEGs straight out of camera. I dare you to find me another combination like this.. 😉

10.0 mm   (in 35mm: 15.0 mm) 1/4 sec;   f/4.0;   ISO 3200
10.0 mm (in 35mm: 15.0 mm)
1/4 sec; f/4.0; ISO 3200

About Gianluca

An in depth knowledge of photography has led Gianluca to travel to many diverse destinations around the world, from the Arctic Polar Circle to Africa’s deserts, from the Far East to the Amazon. Gianluca’s photographs have appeared in various publications including National Geographic Magazine, New York times, Newsweek, Los Angeles Times, CondèNaste, Bloomberg News.

His images are represented by National Geographic Creative.
His series of images from India has been projected at Musèe de Elysèee in Lausanne.

Gianluca is also a member of NAPP (National Association of Photoshop Professionals) and he has an intense lecturing and teaching activity counting various seminars and workshops: he teaches reportage at European Institute of Design of Milan, and is a Photography Expert and teacher for National Geographic Expeditions.

When not on assignment Gianluca spends his time in Switzerland and in Italy.

Click visit his website
Follow Gianluca on Twitter

Fujifilm at The Photography Show at the NEC in Birmingham

So today marked a big day for the photography industry in the UK. It was the first day of the inaugural Photography Show held at the NEC in Birmingham.

Last year when everyone heard the news that Focus on Imaging was to end, everyone’s hearts were heavy and no-one was quite sure if this was a sign that the imaging industry might be on the decline. However, when it was announced that The Photography Show would take it’s place, optimism was restored and we’ve been looking forward to this event ever since.

Here’s a few images I shot throughout the day. If you can’t make it, hopefully this will give you a bit of an insight into what you are missing.

Here's the stand yesterday afternoon. Built but not furnished.
Here’s our stand yesterday afternoon. Built but not furnished…
The Fujifilm stand. X certainly marks the spot
… and here it is, ready to go this morning. X certainly marks the spot!
The gates open, the stampede begins
The gates open, the stampede begins.
As anticipated, the X-T1 drew a huge crowd of people that wanted to get their hands on one.
As anticipated, the X-T1 drew a huge crowd of people that wanted to get their hands on one.
And here's the two most popular items on the Fujifilm stand. The X-T1 and the XF56mmF1.2 lens
Here’s the two most popular items on the Fujifilm stand: the X-T1 and the XF56mmF1.2 lens.
As Fujifilm is celebrating 80 years in photography, we thought we'd make a wee mention of it on our stand
As Fujifilm is celebrating 80 years in photography, we thought we’d make a wee mention of it on our stand
Later in the afternoon when the crowd subsided a bit, these visitors finally get their hands on the X-T1 for the first time
Later in the afternoon when the crowd subsided a bit, these visitors finally get their hands on the X-T1 for the first time.
Here's our man Nathan talking about the X-T2. If it's possible, he's even more in love with it than I am!
Here’s our man Nathan talking about the X-T1. If it’s possible, he’s even more in love with it than I am!
The Fujifilm X Signature service will launch very soon. Here's a few sample cameras showing off some of the unique colours you will soon be able to have.
The Fujifilm X Signature service will launch very soon. Here’s a few sample cameras showing off some of the unique colours you will soon be able to have.

Meanwhile, away from the Fujifilm stand…

Calumet are one of the retailers that are here at The Photography Show and selling Fujifilm products
Calumet are one of the retailers that are here at The Photography Show and selling Fujifilm products
Camera World are another...
Camera World are another…
International Garden Photographer of the Year had this awesome garden. Here I'm spotted by a fellow X100S user while trying to shoot people shooting flowers (mind, blown)
International Garden Photographer of the Year had this awesome garden. Here I’m spotted by a fellow X100S user while trying to shoot people shooting flowers (mind, blown)
Could this be a clever nod to previous photography events at the NEC?
Could this be a clever nod to previous photography events at the NEC?
There's a live stage with various talkers covering various different subjects
There’s a live stage with various talkers covering various different subjects.
Fujifilm's Adam getting photobombed. Or Fujifilm's Adam photobombing someone else. You choose
Fujifilm’s Adam getting photobombed. Or Fujifilm’s Adam photobombing someone else. You choose.

Thanks for checking out this blog. Any questions, fill in a comment below or get in touch on Twitter @marchorner or @Fujifilm_UK. You can also keep up to date in real time on Instagram – http://instagram.com/fujifilm_uk

If you do come to the show over the next few days, be sure to come and say hello.

Marc

Interview with Kevin Mullins: first impressions of the XF10-24 and XF56 lenses and the X-T1 camera

We invited professional wedding photographer Kevin Mullins to come to Yokohama in Japan to speak on the Fujifilm stand at CP+ about how he started using Fujifilm products and how they help him create his distinctive documentary style approach to wedding photography.

We planned the whole thing out, even to the details of where he is to stand on the stage, however there was one slight issue that we were unable to plan for – the snow.

Heavy snowfall throughout Friday has meant that the CP+ show was cancelled today, but don’t think that means Kevin was given a day off. Instead we went out for a little walk around Yokohama and he was able to try out the new XF10-24mm and XF56mm lenses and also the new Fujifilm X-T1 compact system camera.

Here’s a quick selection of unedited jpeg shots Kevin has taken, plus a few of his initial thoughts on how each lens performed.

The FUJINON XF56mmF1.2 R lens

X-E2 with XF56mm - 1/200 sec;   f/1.2;   ISO 1000
X-E2 with XF56mm – 1/200 sec; f/1.2; ISO 1000
X-E2 with XF56mm - 1/200 sec;   f/1.2;   ISO 800
X-E2 with XF56mm – 1/200 sec; f/1.2; ISO 800
X-T1 with XF56mm - 1/4000 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 200
X-T1 with XF56mm – 1/4000 sec; f/1.8; ISO 200

“I’m really impressed with the handling of the lens, especially the speed of focus. The depth of field at f/1.2 is remarkable for an APS-C sized sensor CSC. I’m really looking forward to using it at a wedding where I’m sure it will become a permanent fixture in my camera bag”

The FUJINON XF10-24mmF4 R OIS lens

X-T1 with XF10-24 - 1/1105 sec;   f/5.6;   ISO 200
X-T1 with XF10-24 – 1/1105 sec; f/5.6; ISO 200
X-T1 with XF10-24 - 1/320 sec;   f/5.6;   ISO 200
X-T1 with XF10-24 – 1/320 sec; f/5.6; ISO 200

“Not being a regular user of a zoom lens, I was really keen to get my hands on the 10-24 and the ability to shoot as a the wide end of the zoom really introduces a new dynamic into the way we can use the X series cameras. The lens handles really well at both ends of the zoom, is very fast and the weight of it doesn’t unbalance the camera”

The X-T1 Compact System Camera

When asked about the X-T1 camera specifically, this is what Kevin had to say about it:

“I’ve been waiting to get my hands on the X-T1 for a while and I’m certainly not disappointed. Although I’ve only used it for a few hours, the viewfinder is simply amazing and the manual controls are well positioned – the camera feels really good in my hands. Well thought out features like the tilting screen, the side loading card and the vertical battery grip really make this a camera that’s going to enhance my everyday shooting”

About Kevin

Kevin Mullins is an award winning UK Wedding Photographer specialising in the documentary style of wedding photography. To see more of his work you can follow him on Facebook or follow his blog.